We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Advertisement
Analytical Cannabis Logo
×

Home > News > Science & Health

Canadian Clinicians Call for More Trials on Childhood Cannabinoid Consumption

Published: Sep 03, 2018   

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Canadian Clinicians Call for More Trials on Childhood Cannabinoid Consumption"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Analytical Cannabis?

Analytical Cannabis Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Canadian Clinicians Call for More Trials on Childhood Cannabinoid Consumption

Canadian parents use unregulated cannabinoids for seizure control in children with neurologic conditions like epilepsy, and clinical trials are needed to inform doctors and parents on prescribing, according to a commentary in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ)


"Without licensed products supported by high-quality evidence, unregulated use of cannabinoids in children will continue, particularly given the impending legalization of cannabis in Canada and parents' desperation for effective treatments," write Drs. Lauren Kelly, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Anne Junker, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC.


A national, innovative approach to trialing cannabinoids in children is needed, with collaboration among academics, industry and provincial governments, recruitment of participants by age group, and incorporation of long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up.


Although challenging, clinical trials should be conducted at multiple sites and involve parent groups.


"Although trials of cannabinoid treatments in children with neurologic disorders certainly qualify as high-risk research in a vulnerable population, excluding this population from high-quality research may deny these patients access to safe and evidence-based treatments. Physicians, understandably, lack confidence in prescribing cannabinoids and in supporting parents who are self-prescribing cannabinoids and require an evidence base to guide them," state the authors.


Strong physician and parental leadership are needed to ensure there is thorough research into the effectiveness of cannabinoids to treat children with neurological disorders.


This article has been republished from materials provided by CMAJ. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference

Kelly, L. E., & Junker, A. (2018). Considerations for clinical trials to study cannabinoids in Canadian children with neurologic disorders. CMAJ, 190(34), E1002-E1003.

 

Like what you just read? You can find similar content on the topic tag shown below.

Science & Health

Stay connected with the latest news in cannabis extraction, science and testing

Get the latest news with the FREE weekly Analytical Cannabis newsletter

 
Advertisement